NanomedicineDay2

CaNCURE students present career-defining research

Fifteen undergraduate CaNCURE trainees presented their co-op research at the 1st Annual CaNCURE Nanomedicine Day on June 15, 2015.  A total of 40 interactive, digital research posters were prepared by undergraduate and graduate students engaged in nanomedicine research. The event was resounding success, with over 100 students, faculty, and researchers attending to support CaNCURE and other Nanomedicine education initiatives at Northeastern University.

See the full article in news@Northeastern: Students Explore Nanomedicine Research on CaNCURE Co-ops

Soleil Doggett (Biology, '16) talks to her fellow peers about her research on oxygenating tumors to stimulate the anti-tumor immune response.

Soleil Doggett (Biology, ’16) introduces fellow students to the idea of improving oxygen delivery to tumors in order to stimulate the immune system.

Jeremy Thong (Nursing, ‘16) describes his research in the diagnosis and treatment of ovarian cancer, for which he was awarded the Best Undergraduate Research Poster Award at Nanomedicine Day.

Jeremy Thong (Nursing, ‘16) describes his research in the diagnosis and treatment of ovarian cancer, for which he was awarded the Best Undergraduate Research Poster Award at the 1st annual Nanomedicine Day.

Craig Pille (Health Sciences, ’16, right) shares his CaNCURE experiences with Kevin Narang (Chemical Engineering, ’16, left), who starts his CaNCURE co-op experience this July.  Craig received the Most Promising Translational Research Award at Nanomedicine Day for his work on nano-plasmonic assays for non-invasive monitoring of tumor treatment response.

Craig Pille (Health Sciences, ’16, right) shares his CaNCURE experiences with Kevin Narang (Chemical Engineering, ’16, left), who starts his CaNCURE co-op experience this July. Craig received the Most Promising Translational Research Award at Nanomedicine Day for his work on nano-plasmonic assays for non-invasive monitoring of tumor treatment response.

Jordan Harris (Chemical Engineering, ’17) presents about the synthesis and testing of surface-switching nanoparticles for cancer treatment.  He received a Most Innovative Cancer Research Award and the Top Chemical Engineering Poster Award for his work.

Jordan Harris (Chemical Engineering, ’17) presents about the synthesis and testing of surface-switching nanoparticles for cancer treatment. He received the Most Innovative Cancer Research Award and Top Chemical Engineering Poster Award for his work.

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posted in: News Monday, March 27, 2017 8:25 PM

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