What is CaNCURE?

CaNCURE was created in 2015 to provide Northeastern University undergrads with experiential training in cancer nanomedicine.  Sixty-six trainees have already completed the program so far, and we expect to train another eighty-nine students in the next 5 years.
Our co-op students spend 6-months performing hands-on research in a NCI-funded research laboratory.   This research experience is supplemented with research and bio/nano innovation seminars, professional development activities, and opportunities to present research.
Our alumni have successfully found new co-op and jobs in cancer research, scholarships to medical school, and scholarships to graduate school.  58% of alumni are currently performing cancer research.

75

Trainees

29

Mentors

31

Publications

118

Presentations


Hear from our Alumni:

“Through my classroom education and experiences on co-op, I have learned about oncology and seen how debilitating both cancer and its treatment side-effects can be.  I am inspired by the possibilities of nanomedicine, and see potential uses in mitigating chemotherapy side effects.”

Jeremy Thong, Nursing, ’16


Trainee Spotlight


Sagi Ravid

Chemical Engineering, '21

Enhanced delivery of camptothecin and doxorubicin conjugates with hyaluronic acid for the treatment of Glioblastoma using microbubble-mediated focused ultrasound

Aviv Liani

Biology, '21

Impact of RPS15 mutation on development and progression of chronic lymphocytic leukemia

Ysaac Zegeye

Cell and Molecular Biology, '21

Using smart biomaterials with immunoadjuvants to treat metastatic breast cancer

Featured Trainee Publication


Upcoming Events

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Mentor Spotlight


Judy Lieberman, M.D.

Chair in Cellular and Molecular Medicine ,

Studies how RNA interference regulates and dysregulates cell differentiation in order to develop new drugs to treat or prevent cancer. Students will characterize anti-cancer therapeutics comprised of membrane-anchored lipoproteins that are incorporated into siRNA-loaded lipid nanoparticles.


Irene Ghobrial, M.D.

Attending Physician, Medical Oncology,

My research focuses on identifying mechanisms of progression in Multiple Myeloma progression, those that are cell autonomous or those dependent on the bone marrow niche. We examine genetic and epigenetic alterations that regulate tumor dissemination and the role of the bone marrow niche in disease progression from early precursor stages (MGUS and smoldering myeloma) to active Multiple Myeloma. I have a broad background in the biology of multiple myeloma and the bone marrow niche. I am the leader and founder of the Center for Prevention of Progression (CPOP) at DFCI, which is based on the premise that early detection and prevention can significantly alter the disease course in hematological malignancies. I am also the leader of the Blood Cancer Research Partnership, a consortium of 11 oncology sites for clinical trials.


Trainee Spotlight


Sagi Ravid

Chemical Engineering, '21

Enhanced delivery of camptothecin and doxorubicin conjugates with hyaluronic acid for the treatment of Glioblastoma using microbubble-mediated focused ultrasound

Catherine Nicholas

Health Science, '20

RHAMM splicing in multiple myeloma (MM) and its implications for immunotherapy

Aviv Liani

Biology, '21

Impact of RPS15 mutation on development and progression of chronic lymphocytic leukemia


 Get Involved

Interested in learning how nanomedicine is used to detect and treat cancer? Want to get involved in developing new nanotechnologies for the clinic? We are looking to match undergrads at Northeastern University with leading Boston researchers and clinicians for a six-month, hands-on research experience.  If you are thinking about a career in cancer science, engineering, or medicine, come get involved in the world’s first undergraduate program in cancer nanomedicine!  We have 9 upcoming openings for the January – June 2019 co-op period.  We will be accepting applications starting in September 2018 via NUcareers.

Going on in the lab right now...